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James Royal-Lawson

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10 Articles worth reading… (Spotted: Week 29-31, 2010)

BBC News website’s content management and publishing systems

The BBC Internet blog often produces some really good in-depth insights into how things work at the BBC. This time, in connection with the recent redesign of BBC News, they take a look at web management, web standards & their in-house CMS

Why QR Codes Are Poised to Hit the Mainstream

SL have just started testing Quick Response codes at a number of bus stops here in Stockholm. Co-incidentally Mashable writes “Why QR Codes Are Poised to Hit the Mainstream” around the same time. You shouldn’t produce any printed matter now without a QR Code in my opinion.

Half of site searches are unsuccessful: report

Half of site searches are unsuccessful. Yet studies have shown that site-searches result in a significantly higher conversion rate than the average. Clear opportunity for improvement there…

The Internet Generation Prefers the Real World

This article from Spiegel Online describes how the (German) Internet Generation would appear to prefers the Real World – or rather, that it is integrated into their lives but that they are not necessarily “internet experts”. What you can conclude is that there is no global norm when it comes to the internet generation and their internet usage. Read my earlier post about Internet usage and young Swedes in Sweden

18 Simple SEO Items Commonly Missed in Web Development

Not a bad list. Your next site won’t be worse if you follow all of these 18 points! There are, of course, more than 18 things that are normally missed.

Blog – Subdomain or Subfolder? Which Is Best?

More on the eternal question of on-domain, off-domain, or sub-folder blog – which is best? Well, they all can be in my opinion. Really does depend on each individual case.

Will the Real Browser Stats Please Stand Up?

Global visitor stats are always misleading. Make sure to always study the stats for your own site (and therefore visitor groups), especially browser version and viewport size before a redesign.

How long are intranet projects?

Steptwo write about how long an intranet project should be (it is often not given enough time) – As is often the case, similar things apply to Internet projects too.

Employees demand a clean intranet home page, no scrolling

Keep it above the fold! Employees demand a clean Intranet home page, no scrolling, fewer links.

Enterprise 2.0 Roll-up: Google Kills Wave, Collaboration Ain’t Easy

In this CMSWire article they’ve taken the example of how a global collaboration product (Google Wave) failed to be adopted and likened it to the difficulty of implementing collaborative tools within the Firewall. Fair few pearls of wisdom from some clued-up people.

8 Articles worth reading… (Spotted: Week 27-28, 2010)

The Real Life Social Network v2

216 slides, takes about 20 mins to view and read; but it’s worth it. It’s where we are heading. With this kind of insight, working at Google, you can start to understand that Google producing a Facebook killer isn’t at all unbelievable or unrealistic.

That website costs how much?

Oh my, I think I’ve found true love! Brandon Godwin (and David Hobbs in the comments) have written some incredibly wise-words. Client expectations of what is needed for the perfect web-presence, and the price they are prepared (or have budgeted) to pay are both too low.

Are We Not Context Strategists?

We’re seeing argument after argument about which discipline lies at the top (or bottom) of the pyramid – “xxx is king”. What we should be doing is concentrating on linking these skills horizontally in order to help organisations get the best out of the web.

Forbes: How To Create A Customer Advocacy Program

“Social media doesn’t scale. That’s right, social media doesn’t scale.” says Jeremiah. He goes on to say that your community managers will always be outnumbered by your customers. You need to have a strategy that does scale. His suggestion: Customer advocacy programs.

Innovation: Shrewd search engines know what you want

New Scientist writes “unfortunately eye-tracking hardware is expensive, and few people use it.” …Not a good reason to use inaccurate mouse-data. Read this explanation of mouse-movement correlation problems from Acuity ETS.

Few Facebook users notice ads on News Feed

An eye tracking report concludes that few Facebook users notice ads on News Feed page, but the majority look at status updates from pages they are fans of. But, with 31% looking at ads in the right hand column they are a really cost effective form of advertising.

Millennials will make online sharing in networks a lifelong habit

Millennials will make online sharing in networks a lifelong habit… or at least that’s their intention right now.

5 Key Trends of 2010: Half-Year Report for The Web

Readwriteweb takes a look a what they consider to be the 5 Key Trends of 2010 so far. A fair chunk of their “trends” are actually “events”, but it’s a worthwhile “year-so-far” summary.

5 Articles worth reading… (Spotted: Week 26, 2010)

Why I Still Blog

Hans Kullin asked and answered Why do I still blog? last week on his blog, this week, John Cass gives his answer. Both provide some interesting insights into the ever-evolving blogosphere.

Yahoo Style Guide

July 6th Yahoo will launch their book, which will cover grammar, punctuation, web accessibility and writing copy that helps SEO. The companion web site has some useful articles too.

10 Reasons Why Your Analytics Are Failing & 13 Tools To Help

The reasons listed here are quite a nice analytics “basics” overview. Covers a lot of things that are all too often overlooked.

Serving Static Content from a Cookieless Domain

You are all (as you’re clever, web-savvy people who read this blog), already serving your static content from a seperate domain. This is a good explaination of why (and how) you should make sure that your media domain doesn’t serve up cookies with all the media requests.

Sitemaps: One file, many content types

Now all specialized sitemap formats can be rolled into one file. Sitemaps, and how Google are enhancing them, is a “you scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours” situation. Google want to serve accurate, useful, search results – and we all want our pages, images, videos, etc to be included. Get scratching.

7 articles worth reading… (Spotted: Week 23 2010)

A twelve step process for a storming Social Media strategy

Straight-forward, practical stuff. A process that isn’t complicated to follow and will give results. The first comment to the post (by Jon Buscall) is also worth reading.

A Cross-cultural eye tracking study

A cross-cultural eye tracking study covering 6 countries (and 30 survey participants in each) shows that international websites can’t be successful ‘one size fits all’ sites due to statistically significant cultural differences in information needs. Would love to see more research into this.

Analytics Basics: Averages and Ratios

Highlighting the advantages of using median values for due to the non-normal distribution of visit lengths. Another article where it’s worth taking the time to read the comments. Brian Clifton and Neil bring up some good points regarding goals.

Designing with Behavioral Economics

Some family examples, nicely packaged in one article. It covers opt-in versus opt-out forms, problems of excessive choice, and Value judgements featuring the wonderful Economist subscription example.

No plans to redesign your site? Now is the time to hire a web design agency

Paul Boag talks a whole load of sense in this post of his. We really have got to break the “rebuild” cycle we’ve have ended up with for websites. My only criticism is that he keeps referring to “website” when he should be using “web presence” (or something similarly broad)

Varning: lyssna inte på ‘good enough’-profeterna

When good enough becomes the goal, when you choose to aim to do something competently, you will never do anything anything fantastic.

SEO site review session from Google I/O 2010

A man after my own heart, Matt Cutts (from Google) does a series of quick site reviews (from an SEO viewpoint). It’s an hour long video, but it gives some real-life examples of why certain things are important.

10 Articles worth reading… (Spotted: Week 21-22, 2010)

The need for speed on the Web

“Customers are highly highly impatient” – Page loading times aren’t just an search engine optimisaton factor, people know what they want, and they give your page very little time to deliver it before moving on…

Efficiently Rendering CSS

The art of optimising page speed is not confined to network requests and server configuration. How you construct your CSS styles also pays a significant role.

Button Color Test: Red beats Green

There’s a fair bit of data out there saying that green and red buttons generally work best for “calls to action”, with red being the better of the two. Here Performable present data saying that red is as much as 21% better.

Google Studies How Search Behavior Changes When Searchers Are Faced with Difficult Questions

Not only is the paper from Google a great read, you could lose yourself for weeks reading all the other interesting papers cited!

Web Safe Font Cheat Sheet v.2 – Including Google Font API

An updated Web Safe Font Cheat Sheet also including Google Fonts. As a bonus the article takes a look at the results (and problems) with using the Google Font API as it is…

Identifying staff tasks

Hands on advice from James at Step Two on how to identify and collect intranet tasks. Tasks, rather than structure, should be your focus when improving an intranet.

Web Execution (Web Team): A Definition

Lisa, as usual, has published a detailed and well thought out article. This time explaining her suggestion of how to structure your web-team into an operative part and a management part. Doesn’t sound too revolutionary when I write it like that, but in reality it is.

10 words I’d ban from all websites

Catherine Toole, CEO of UK-based firm Sticky Content, lists 10 works she’d ban from websites. I think she did very well to restrain herself to just 10…

Your website is not a project

We spend six figures on a new [site], but usually can’t justify a single full time editor.” A number of very good points in this post.

Eye Gaze Data and the Correlation With Mouse Movement

Mouse movement and eye movement bear very little relation to each other – Mouse tracking *without* eye tracking will give you a distorted impression of behaviour.

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