Beantin

James Royal-Lawson

eyeTracking

6 Articles worth reading… (Spotted: Week 34, 2010)

The business case for social intranets

To quote Oscar: “Most people will come to understand that a social intranet is not just about adding features such as blogs, wikis, activity feeds & micro-blogging on top of a traditional intranet; it’s about rethinking the purpose of intranets with the intention of bringing the paradigm shift in how we communicate & collaborate that is taking place on the web to the very core of how enterprises are operated & managed.”

Enterprise Microlearning

The significance of enterprise microblogging (or “microlearning”). Not only does it state the importance of status updates in the workplace, but also gives a number of practical examples of their use.

Does news add any value to an intranet?

Time after time when we look at intranet stats and surveys we see the evidence that employees just aren’t that interested in news articles – they want things (especially on the start page) that help them get their jobs done.

User behavior in SERPs. Eye tracking study July 2010

This translation of a Spanish eye tracking study shows how people’s intentions (they tasks they are trying to complete) affect their behaviour when viewing search engine result pages.

Santa Barbara Zoo launches smartphone technology

Using QR codes is a cost-effective and straight-forward way to improve visitor interaction at zoos and museums. Hunt down relevant content (perhaps it’s already on your site?) and print some new signs plus some guides for visitors explaining how to scan the codes.

Halfords: mobile site review

Lots of things here that Halfords could improve and tweak. Interesting to see the start of a trend for “collect in store” (rather than “buy via mobile”). It’s a mistake though to prevent mobile users from accessing the regular “desktop” site.

5 new social memetrackers

Twingly Channels is a social news reader what gives you the possibility to aggregate feeds and real-time search results into a single channel where many people sharing the same interest can view, comment and vote on the content.

Earlier this month Twingly opened their doors a little wider and started to allow anyone to create channels. So I took the opportunity to create five new channels focusing on five seperate subjects.

Content that receives attention – such as retweets, linking blog posts, likes, comments – bubbles up to the surface and is shown under “top stories”. If you really want to dive in deep then you can click on “Show incoming stories” for a real-time display of incoming articles.

Eye tracking

http://www.twingly.com/eyetracking

Articles, blogs and resources about eye tracking and usability testing using eye tracking.

Intranet

http://www.twingly.com/intranet

Articles, resources, blogs about Intranets, intranet managment and intranet collaboration.

Google Analytics

http://www.twingly.com/ga

Aritcles, blogs and resources about Google Analytics, measurement and web analysis.

QR Codes

http://www.twingly.com/qr-codes

Aritcles, blogs and resources about Quick Response Codes and their uses.

Beantin

http://www.twingly.com/beantin

Beantin says and Beantin reads… A collection of my blog posts across all my blogs plus my favourited tweets.

SEO

http://www.twingly.com/seo

A bonus channel. This one wasn’t created by me, but rather by Simon Sundén. Contains everything regarding Search Engine Optimization in English.

What do you read?

If you read any blogs related to the above topics and think they would be good to add to the Twingly Channels, then get in touch with me and let me know!

8 Articles worth reading… (Spotted: Week 27-28, 2010)

The Real Life Social Network v2

216 slides, takes about 20 mins to view and read; but it’s worth it. It’s where we are heading. With this kind of insight, working at Google, you can start to understand that Google producing a Facebook killer isn’t at all unbelievable or unrealistic.

That website costs how much?

Oh my, I think I’ve found true love! Brandon Godwin (and David Hobbs in the comments) have written some incredibly wise-words. Client expectations of what is needed for the perfect web-presence, and the price they are prepared (or have budgeted) to pay are both too low.

Are We Not Context Strategists?

We’re seeing argument after argument about which discipline lies at the top (or bottom) of the pyramid – “xxx is king”. What we should be doing is concentrating on linking these skills horizontally in order to help organisations get the best out of the web.

Forbes: How To Create A Customer Advocacy Program

“Social media doesn’t scale. That’s right, social media doesn’t scale.” says Jeremiah. He goes on to say that your community managers will always be outnumbered by your customers. You need to have a strategy that does scale. His suggestion: Customer advocacy programs.

Innovation: Shrewd search engines know what you want

New Scientist writes “unfortunately eye-tracking hardware is expensive, and few people use it.” …Not a good reason to use inaccurate mouse-data. Read this explanation of mouse-movement correlation problems from Acuity ETS.

Few Facebook users notice ads on News Feed

An eye tracking report concludes that few Facebook users notice ads on News Feed page, but the majority look at status updates from pages they are fans of. But, with 31% looking at ads in the right hand column they are a really cost effective form of advertising.

Millennials will make online sharing in networks a lifelong habit

Millennials will make online sharing in networks a lifelong habit… or at least that’s their intention right now.

5 Key Trends of 2010: Half-Year Report for The Web

Readwriteweb takes a look a what they consider to be the 5 Key Trends of 2010 so far. A fair chunk of their “trends” are actually “events”, but it’s a worthwhile “year-so-far” summary.

7 articles worth reading… (Spotted: Week 23 2010)

A twelve step process for a storming Social Media strategy

Straight-forward, practical stuff. A process that isn’t complicated to follow and will give results. The first comment to the post (by Jon Buscall) is also worth reading.

A Cross-cultural eye tracking study

A cross-cultural eye tracking study covering 6 countries (and 30 survey participants in each) shows that international websites can’t be successful ‘one size fits all’ sites due to statistically significant cultural differences in information needs. Would love to see more research into this.

Analytics Basics: Averages and Ratios

Highlighting the advantages of using median values for due to the non-normal distribution of visit lengths. Another article where it’s worth taking the time to read the comments. Brian Clifton and Neil bring up some good points regarding goals.

Designing with Behavioral Economics

Some family examples, nicely packaged in one article. It covers opt-in versus opt-out forms, problems of excessive choice, and Value judgements featuring the wonderful Economist subscription example.

No plans to redesign your site? Now is the time to hire a web design agency

Paul Boag talks a whole load of sense in this post of his. We really have got to break the “rebuild” cycle we’ve have ended up with for websites. My only criticism is that he keeps referring to “website” when he should be using “web presence” (or something similarly broad)

Varning: lyssna inte på ‘good enough’-profeterna

When good enough becomes the goal, when you choose to aim to do something competently, you will never do anything anything fantastic.

SEO site review session from Google I/O 2010

A man after my own heart, Matt Cutts (from Google) does a series of quick site reviews (from an SEO viewpoint). It’s an hour long video, but it gives some real-life examples of why certain things are important.

10 Articles worth reading… (Spotted: Week 21-22, 2010)

The need for speed on the Web

“Customers are highly highly impatient” – Page loading times aren’t just an search engine optimisaton factor, people know what they want, and they give your page very little time to deliver it before moving on…

Efficiently Rendering CSS

The art of optimising page speed is not confined to network requests and server configuration. How you construct your CSS styles also pays a significant role.

Button Color Test: Red beats Green

There’s a fair bit of data out there saying that green and red buttons generally work best for “calls to action”, with red being the better of the two. Here Performable present data saying that red is as much as 21% better.

Google Studies How Search Behavior Changes When Searchers Are Faced with Difficult Questions

Not only is the paper from Google a great read, you could lose yourself for weeks reading all the other interesting papers cited!

Web Safe Font Cheat Sheet v.2 – Including Google Font API

An updated Web Safe Font Cheat Sheet also including Google Fonts. As a bonus the article takes a look at the results (and problems) with using the Google Font API as it is…

Identifying staff tasks

Hands on advice from James at Step Two on how to identify and collect intranet tasks. Tasks, rather than structure, should be your focus when improving an intranet.

Web Execution (Web Team): A Definition

Lisa, as usual, has published a detailed and well thought out article. This time explaining her suggestion of how to structure your web-team into an operative part and a management part. Doesn’t sound too revolutionary when I write it like that, but in reality it is.

10 words I’d ban from all websites

Catherine Toole, CEO of UK-based firm Sticky Content, lists 10 works she’d ban from websites. I think she did very well to restrain herself to just 10…

Your website is not a project

We spend six figures on a new [site], but usually can’t justify a single full time editor.” A number of very good points in this post.

Eye Gaze Data and the Correlation With Mouse Movement

Mouse movement and eye movement bear very little relation to each other – Mouse tracking *without* eye tracking will give you a distorted impression of behaviour.

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